You Can’t Get There From Here

Heading_BirdCalls

Autumn is a season of change. To the average backyard birder, it is also a time of excitement and anticipation. We are witnesses to our songbirds as they prepare for the onslaught of winter. Food sources are investigated and memorized. Shelters are given a look see and once over. Mixed flocks happily flirt about as the constant pursuit for dependable, natural food sources is dampened by the diminishing daylight hours.

Each of us who feeds wild birds should be using this time to prepare our feeding stations for the ice and snow that is sure to be a daily ingredient of our bird watching this winter.

During the warm seasons, we tend to locate our bird feeders and bird baths at the edge of our properties, away from the backyard areas that are prone to human activities. Our children and pets use grassy lawns for recreation. Wild birds feel more comfortable alongside tree lines of properties during the egg laying and hatchling stages. This arrangement works best for both parties involved and is the optimum solution for birders who wish to entertain wild birds while pursuing normal family activities.

For most families, however, the winter season is a lonely time for that same backyard. As the snow piles up, the large acreage is barren of children and pets. The spring/summer locations for your bird feeders and baths at the property’s edge could be a logistical issue during winter. How do you plan to fill these feeders so far from your home? If you like to shovel great distances, this will provide a much needed workout.

If you wish to limit your snow removal activities, you should consider positioning your feeding stations nearer to your house or apartment.
If you wish to limit your snow removal activities, you should consider positioning your feeding stations nearer to your house or apartment.

If you wish to limit your snow removal activities, you should consider positioning your feeding stations nearer to your house or apartment. Many customers have slipped and hurt themselves during slippery conditions while trying to refill feeders that were not properly stationed. There is a simple solution.

Use these upcoming weeks to plan your winter bird feeder and bird bath locations. Try to visualize the snow path necessary to reach this new location. If you own a deck, this is extremely useful for a winter feeding area. Most decks have an outdoor rated electrical plug nearby for your heated bird bath or deicer. Consider the use of deck mounted poles to hang your bird feeders. Premium iron poles will allow you the option of a clamp or screw-on mount for your deck posts or railings. Swivel arms provide ease of use and access to your bird feeders.

Enjoy your birds!

Wild Bird Depot is located on Rt 11 in Gilford, NH. Steve is a contributing author in major publications, a guest lecturer at major conventions in Atlanta and St. Louis as well as the host of WEZS 1350AM radio show “Bird Calls” with Lakes Region Newsday @ 8:30AM. Wild Bird Depot has donated over $5,000 to local rehabilitators and local nature centers since 1996. Be sure to check out our blog “Bird Droppings” via our website www.wildbirddepot.com. Like us on Facebook for great contests and prizes.