• Category Archives SportThoughts
  • The Celtics And Walter Brown

    Mike Moffett

     by Mike Moffett
    Weirs Times Columnist

    The Celtics And Walter Brown
    While watching the Celtics’ wonderful 115-105 Game #7 victory over the Washington Wizards last week at the “new” Boston TD Garden, I was struck, as always, by the occasional camera shots of all the championship banners and retired numbers hanging from the Garden rafters.
    As I pondered the incredible long-term success enjoyed by the NBA’s most storied franchise, I focused on one of the retired numbers in particular—Number 1.
    Many fans are oblivious as to whom that number represents, but Walter Brown is someone that all Celtics fans should revere—for many reasons.
    A Massachusetts native who attended Philips Exeter Academy, Brown succeeded his father George as manager of the old Boston Garden, which was then a hockey mecca. First and foremost a hockey guy, Walter actually coached the USA hockey team to its first Gold Medal in the 1933 Ice Hockey World Championships .
    An ongoing challenge for the Garden back then was what to do with the building when the Bruins weren’t playing. After World War II, entrepreneurs planned for a new professional basketball league—one that would eventually become the NBA. Brown wanted in. So he took out a mortgage on his house to come up with the money to reserve rights to the franchise that became the Celtics, who played their first game in Boston in 1946.
    The team struggled early on, but Brown stayed with it. Attendance improved with the acquisitions of former Holy Cross star Bob Cousy and Coach Red Auerbach in 1950. The Celtics became a playoff team which generated crucial extra revenue. Still, Brown couldn’t always make the payroll. One year he was months late in paying the Celtics their playoff bonuses. The players knew they had money coming their way, but patiently cut the owner some slack because they trusted Brown and knew he had the team’s best interests at heart. Continue reading  Post ID 2825


  • World All-Star Baseball

    Will Washington National Ryan Zimmerman be an All-Star again in 2017 and 2018?”

    Mike Moffett

     by Mike Moffett
    Weirs Times Columnist

    World All-Star Baseball
    Sports Illustrated’s ace baseball writer, Tom Verducci, recently proposed replacing the current Major League Baseball All-Star Game format with a five-day mid-season World Baseball Classic tournament. The WBC presently goes in March where it has to compete with March Madness, Spring Training, etc. An eight-team, five day, international tournament in July that yields a world champion is a great idea.
    A 24-man All-Star roster should be sufficient. Presently SIXTY-SIX All-Stars show up for the Mid-Summer Classic—33 from each league = too many.
    Hold the event in Chicago or New York or someplace with two big baseball parks. The quarterfinal/first-day round requires four games—i.e two doubleheaders. Then come two semifinal games and a championship game. So we actually get SEVEN All-Star games instead of just one. And with MLB on hiatus, and no other major league sports happening, the WBC gets maximum media attention—both domestically and internationally.
    A home run derby and similar All-Star traditions could be worked into the schedule—as in how the NBA turned its All-Star game into a multi-day, multi-event festival.
    Hopefully those with the power and influence can overcome inertia and make this happen. The 2018 MLB All-Star Game has already been awarded to Washington D.C. Can this commitment be re-worked? Verducci’s inspired idea deserves consideration. Maybe just use Nationals Park and RFK Stadium and implement the WBC tournament in D.C.
    If we can put a man on the moon then we can certainly figure out how to do an international baseball tournament!

    NHL ALL-STAR HOCKEY
    The NHL is not going to support the 2018 Winter Olympics in South Korea, as they have other Olympic Games. Remember the Sochi Games in 2014? The NHL created a two-week schedule break, and in lieu of an All-Star Game the NHL players played for their national teams in the Olympics. Not just for the USA and Canada, but also for teams from the Czech Continue reading  Post ID 2825


  • Marines, Moffetts and Marathons

    Mike Moffett

     by Mike Moffett
    Weirs Times Columnist

    MARINES, MOFFETTS, AND MARATHONS
    Fitness is part of the Marines Corps ethos. If you want to be a Marine, then you need to be able to run. My brother John was a cross-country standout in high school, so when he joined the Marines running was not a problem. Because he could shoot, move, and communicate he was the honor graduate for his Parris Island recruit training platoon. He later became an officer.
    I followed John into the Marine Corps and for a while we were both lieutenants stationed in California. It took me longer than it did John to become a shooting expert but I eventually made it. I also recorded some excellent run times but never could quite match those of John.
    After finally beating him in a 10K road race on a Marine base, I immediately called our mom with the great news. Always careful not to show favoritism, she congratulated both of us instead of just me!
    John eventually ran in the Marine Corps Marathon, the same one that Oprah Winfrey famously completed. John’s time was considerably better than Oprah’s fairly impressive 4:29:15

    Marine lieutenants Michael and John Moffett, circa 1985.

    Continue reading  Post ID 2825


  • Devin Booker Goes For 70!

    Mike Moffett

     by Mike Moffett
    Weirs Times Columnist

    Devin Booker Goes For 70!

    One of sport’s attractions involves unpredictability. To paraphrase Forrest Gump, “Sports are like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re gonna get.”
    A movie is what it is—a fait accompli. Similarly, a Broadway play has a script. Even a live concert features music that’s already been written. But a sports event unfolds in actual time—a true reality show.
    A game can break your heart OR send your spirits soaring. You never know. The price of admission is the same either way.
    Every time I go to Fenway I hope to see a perfect baseball game. Or a no-hitter. Or a great catch. If the hits come early then let there be a lot of them. Let there be a record set. Or maybe a fight!
    (I was at Fenway when Thurman Munson and Carlton Fisk had that fight at home plate and the benches emptied. Loved it!)
    When it comes to Celtics games, I just want to see Boston win with some great plays along the way to get the crowd going.
    And when the C’s are playing a lousy team—like the Phoenix Suns—a friendly wager makes the action more compelling. So during a recent trip to the “Garden” for a Celtics-Suns game I made a couple little bets to make the game more interesting, in case the Celtics romped (which they did). I bet on the Celtics and the “over,” the latter meaning that I guessed that there would be more than 219 points scored in total.
    When there were less than five minutes left in the first quarter, and the Suns had yet to score a field goal, the “over” didn’t look so good. But then both teams got hot and eventually 250 points were scored, as Boston won 130-120.
    One player in particular got hot—Suns rookie Devin Booker, who played one season at Kentucky before joining the Suns last fall as a 19-year-old rookie.
    The Garden scoreboard shows the point totals for the players in the game and at one point in the third quarter someone noticed that Booker had 46 points. So then we focused on the rookie, who stayed hot in the fourth quarter and made a bunch of last minute free throws to end up with 70 points.
    Wow! Only five NBA players had ever scored 70 points before—and Michael Jordan was not one of them. (Larry Bird holds the Celtic record of a mere 60 points.)
    So I went home happy. The Celtics won big and an all-time record was set. The only thing missing was a fight! Continue reading  Post ID 2825


  • (Semi) Pro Basketball In N.H.

    Mike Moffett

     by Mike Moffett
    Weirs Times Columnist

    With college basketball’s “March Madness-2017” reaching its climax, many basketball fans can’t help but cast their minds back to great games and players of the past. Through the wonders of You-Tube many of these magic moments can be relived with a couple clicks on a computer mouse. Nostalgia has its place.
    However, some basketball stories are just not available via You-Tube. But they can still be savored via the “oral history” recollections of hoop historians regarding the wonderful players and performances of yesteryear.
    Such a historian is Concord’s Bob Gile. Presently a Vice President for Investments at Benjamin F. Edwards and Company, Gile graduated from Franklin High School in 1951. He later graduated from Dartmouth College and then served as a naval officer before entering the world of finance. Some of Gile’s most vivid memories from his Franklin days involve some of the best basketball in the country taking place right in the Franklin High School gym.

    Did the great Bob Cousy play basketball in Franklin High’s gym?

    Franklin, N.H. Not North Carolina, not Kentucky, not Indiana, and not Madison Square Garden.
    Franklin
    “In the late 1940s a sort of semi-pro basketball circuit evolved in New England,” recalled Gile. “Sunday afternoon basketball became an entertainment staple in Franklin.”
    In those post-World War II days, with television in its infancy, locals packed the Franklin gym to watch the Franklin Comets take on all challengers. John Barry was the coach/general manager, and at first the Comets featured local standouts like Frank Mead, Pete Shanelaris and the Robitaillle brothers. But as other teams in the region ramped things up, eventually the Comet roster featured non-locals, like former Bowdoin star Norm Cook, or 6-foot-6 Jack Darton, who hailed from New York. New Hampton’s Everett Nordstrom also became part of the mix as the quality of play skyrocketed. Continue reading  Post ID 2825


  • Rick Barry And Son(s)

    Rick Barry playing with the Golden State Warriors.

    Mike Moffett

     by Mike Moffett
    Weirs Times Columnist

    This being a March of college hoop Madness, alert basketball fans may have noticed a Canyon Barry playing for the Florida Gators. Yes, he’s the son of Hall-of-Famer Rick and his second wife Lynn. Canyon is actually a grad student at UF, studying nuclear engineering, having already graduated from the College of Charleston—with a year’s hoop eligibility remaining.
    Named for the Grand Canyon, where he was conceived, the younger Barry is one of the top scorers for the Gators, who earned the fourth seed in the Eastern Regionals.
    Canyon has four half-brothers who all played pro ball—Scooter, Jon, Brent, and Drew, sons of Rick and his first wife Pam.
    In his prime, Rick was the top forward in pro basketball. I met him in 1971 at a basketball camp in Fitzwilliam, N.H., where the other big name was Jerry West, then the top guard in pro basketball. (Imagine LeBron James and Steph Curry coming to New Hampshire today to run a summer camp to make some extra money!)
    Barry was with the Nets then, who lost in the ABA Finals to the Pacers the next year. Rick then returned to his former Warrior team, whom he led to an NBA title in 1975. Continue reading  Post ID 2825


  • New Golf Rules!

    Mike Moffett

     by Mike Moffett
    Weirs Times Columnist

    The annual Masters Golf Tournament—my favorite sports event of the year—is only a month away. The flags are going up at Loudon Country Cub—my favorite golf course. So it’s a good time to reflect on long-overdue golf rule changes recently promulgated by the U.S. Golf Association.
    Most people I play with follow a very liberal interpretation of golf rules, i.e. if you can’t find a ball on a leafy autumn fairway, then just drop a ball where you think your ball ended up. No problemo! Or any two-foot putt is a “Gimme!”
    Of course, in league and tournament competitions, one really needs to know and follow the rules, especially if your opponent is one of those dreaded “sticklers.”
    Still, not only do the new and overdue USGA rule changes make sense but there are actually FEWER rules now. (Washington and Concord take note!)

    Horton Smith won the first Masters Golf Tournament in 1934.

    For example:
    *There is no longer a penalty for accidentally moving your ball on the green. (I hate it when that happens!)
    *You can repair damage on the green before putting. (My balls always seemed to end up behind an unrepaired hole on every green.)
    *A ball is declared lost after a three minute search, as opposed to five minutes. (This rule change will really speed up play with some of the guys I play with.)
    *Under the new rules, you can do a ball drop from as close as one inch above the ground, as opposed to shoulder height. (Bravo! This will cut down on my ball drops rolling into water hazards.)
    *If you throw your putter and damage it, you can still keep it in your bag. (I’d been carrying two putters anyway. Hope that’s not against any rule.)
    Continue reading  Post ID 2825


  • First Pro Sports Games

    Mike Moffett

     by Mike Moffett
    Weirs Times Columnist

    Recent Facebook postings remind us that 2017 is a year for Red Sox commemorations—this being the 50th Anniversary of the pennant-winning 1967 Impossible Dream Boston team that created the modern Red Sox Nation. While young Sox fans have no recollection of that magical year they should better appreciate Boston’s baseball heritage through the anniversary dates the team will be highlighting as the season unfolds.
    Some of these Facebook postings from old-timers including reminiscences about first trips to Fenway Park.
    My first trip to the Boston ball-yard was on August 9, 1972. My bleacher seat cost $2 and Rico Petrocelli hit a home run as the BoSox beat the Cleveland Indians 5-2. When I played golf with Rico last summer I asked if he remembered that game and he confessed he had no memory of it—in contrast to my vivid recollection.

    Weirs Times columnist Mike Moffett as himself at a 2005 Celtics game with Lucky the Leprechaun.

    Continue reading  Post ID 2825


  • Prep School Hoops

    Mike Moffett

     by Mike Moffett
    Weirs Times Columnist

    Granite Staters rightly take pride in Concord High grad Matt Bonner playing 12 seasons in the NBA. But did you know that no less than TEN alumni from Wolfeboro’s Brewster Academy have played in the NBA? Check out Brewster’s web site. The school’s captured four National Prep Championships since 2010, as well as five New England Prep School Athletic Conference (NEPSAC) Class AAA Championships since 2008. Over the past decade, Brewster’s averaged over 30 victories per year (305-50) for a winning percentage over .860. The Bobcats have captured six regular season NEPSAC Class AAA Championships since 2008. And Brewster’s advanced to the National Final Four in each of the past eight years.
    Besides Brewster’s ten NBA alumni, over 50 others have played professionally in other leagues around the world, including the NBA Developmental League—not to mention the numerous Bobcat grads who’ve played college ball at every level.
    Who knew?
    Brewster head coach Jason Smith is in his 17th season as Brewster’s head hoop coach, having compiled a 414-109 (.792) record during his first 16 seasons.
    But our Lakes Region prep school basketball universe includes much more beyond Brewster. Continue reading  Post ID 2825


  • Blue Jackets


    Mike Moffett

     by Mike Moffett
    Weirs Times Columnist

    NEWS ITEM: A recent 16-game win streak gave the Columbus Blue Jackets the best record in the National Hockey League.
    Yes, it’s true. My Blue Jackets are finally on top. A “Cinderella” story, to be sure.
    There aren’t many of us Blue Jacket fans around. Truth be told, the Bruins are my favorite NHL team, but I’ve always been a closet Blue Jacket fan, going back to when they joined the NHL in 2000.
    I like the idea of a major league pro sports team in a “small” town like Columbus and I like their team name. “Blue Jackets” honors Ohio’s considerable Civil War heritage—kind of like “Patriots” honors New England’s Revolutionary War heritage. (When it comes to the Civil Wat, I’m definitely a fan of the North.
    My favorite Blue Jacket is #13, right wing Cam Atkinson, the NHL leader in power play goals. My man Cam is a New Englander, hailing from Connecticut—which, like Ohio, was on the right side in the Civil War. Goalkeeper Sergie Bobrovsky has a sparkling 1.97 goals against average at this writing. A hot goalkeeper can take a team a long ways. My man Sergie was born in Novokuznetsk in the old Soviet Union back in 1988. Presumably he’s extolled the virtues of freedom and capitalism in his old homeland. I love it.
    My Blue Jackets have been loveably hapless throughout most of their history. They did make the playoffs twice, but were quickly eliminated with first round losses in 2009 and 2014 respectively. But their recent win streak—one shy of the all-time NHL record—could be a harbinger of future success. May they not only win their first playoff series, but advance to the Stanley Cup Finals (assuming the Bruins aren’t viable).
    I’d love to see my Blue Jackets face the dreaded San Jose Sharks in the Finals. While the NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman and his fellow poo-bahs may prefer a New York/LA or a Boston/Chicago Final, I like the idea of two small markets making it to the Finals. San Jose actually was in the Finals last year, losing to Pittsburgh, so a classic Columbus/San Jose showdown is quite possible.
    Actually, Columbus has a population of almost a million—the 15th largest city in the country. And San Jose is even bigger, with over a million inhabitants. But if we can’t have a Bruins/Blackhawks final, then bring on the Blue Jackets and Sharks.
    As Cinderella said, “Dreams do come true!”

    Sports Quiz
    What is the maximum time limit allowed to look for a lost ball in golf? (Answer follows)

    Born Today …
    That is to say, sports standouts born on January 26 include baseball catcher/actor/announcer Bob Uecker (1935) and ice hockey legend Wayne Gretzky (1961)

    Sportsquote
    “I gave (pitcher) Mike Cuellar more chances than I gave my first wife.”—Earl Weaver, Baltimore Orioles manager

    Sportsquiz Answer
    Five minutes.

    Michael Moffett was a Professor of Sports Management for Plymouth State University and NHTI-Concord. He’s co-author of the critically-acclaimed and award-winning “FAHIM SPEAKS: A Warrior-Actor’s Odyssey from Afghanistan to Hollywood and Back” (with the Marines)—which is available through Amazon.com. His e-mail address is mimoffett@comcast.net.


  • Sportscasters

    Jim Nantz

    Mike Moffett

     by Mike Moffett
    Weirs Times Columnist

    The final 2016 regular season NFL football game was played on Sunday evening, January 1, 2017. The Green Bay at Detroit contest was part of the Sunday Night Football series, featureing sportscasters Al Michaels and Chris Collinsworth. The Packers controlled the game, but I watched because I enjoyed Michaels and Collinsworth. To paraphrase Sally Field, “I like them. I really like them!”
    Michaels, 72, has done national sports telecasts since the 1970s. He’s forever immortalized by his shout-out at the end of the American Olympic ice hockey team’s 1980 victory over the Soviet Union. “Do you believe in miracles? YES!”
    Collinsworth, 57, is a former All-NFL wide receiver with the Cincinnati Bengals who once worked for FOX. These guys are knowledgeable, consummate professionals who love sports while enjoying the broadcast booth.
    With the NFL’s network television deals worth billions of dollars, the telecasters handle some very valuable material. They can’t alienate viewers.
    FOX’s “A-Team” of Joe Buck and Troy Aikman are a bit iconoclastic, but they transmit a sense of drama, reverence, and excitement about every game they cover. Their voices on Sunday afternoons have become part of the sound-tracks of our sports lives.
    The CBS “A-Team” of Jim Nantz and Phil Simms are also welcome and appealing regular guests to my living room. Nantz is also CBS’s “Voice of the Masters” golf tournament—an event wouldn’t be the same without him. Maybe that’s why Nantz makes over $5 million a year talking about sports. But Nantz’ salary doesn’t compare to that of Jim Rome, the sports host of the most popular radio show in the world, who makes $30 million a year.
    Nice work if you can get it.
    Sports broadcasting remains a dream job—one that’s difficult to retire from. Dodger announcer Vin Scully was still describing Los Angeles baseball action this past season at the age of 88. Scully’s done Dodger games for 67 years, going back to when the team was in Brooklyn. Continue reading  Post ID 2825


  • Florida Sports Adventures

    Mike Moffett

     by Mike Moffett
    Weirs Times Columnist

    A fellow Plymouth State alumnus named Steve recently invited me to fly to Florida to meet and speak to veterans on beautiful Marco Island. Not wanting to “look a gift horse in the mouth,” I happily accepted, exchanging snow and sleet for sun and sand.
    The Florida people were wonderful, although a transplanted New Yorker—an Air Force vet—sized me up with a critical eye at a social event.
    “So you’re a Marine and a Red Sox fan? What a bad combination!”
    I gave him a Clint Eastwood squint.
    “It’s better than being an Air Force guy and a Yankee fan. That’s the worst of all worlds.”
    My antagonist stared at me for a moment.
    “No, the worst of all worlds would be a Navy guy who likes the Mets.”
    We both laughed and did a fist bump and then the Yankee fan bought me a drink.
    The enemy of my enemy is my friend.

    A Gulf of Mexico boat ride provides an opportunity to absorb much-needed sunshine.



    My Sunshine State sojourn was a wonderful opportunity to speak, swim, and socialize. During a boat trip around the island, my host cautioned me about getting too much sun.
    “Bring it on,” I exclaimed, as I removed my shirt. “It was ten below zero back home.”
    I ended up with a sunburn, but that was OK.
    Sports are ubiquitous in my world, of course, and circumstances required that we find an appropriate venue to watch the Patriots/Broncos showdown. That venue turned out to be the Foxboro Sports Tavern near Naples, where the walls were covered with Boston sports memorabilia and the seats were filled with New England expatriates. The lone Denver fan there had about as much chance as did the Broncos, as the Pats romped.
    Golf was a must and Steve put the top down on his sporty red convertible and drove me to meet a couple friends at the Arrowhead Golf Club. I borrowed some clubs from Roger The Marco Island City Manager, but I was out of synch and didn’t play well and unfortunately lost most of my benefactor’s golf balls. It WAS cool to play on a flat course, although there were plenty of giant sand traps and water hazards.

    This alligator made playing the adjacent golf ball a bit more complicated.

    On the back nine Steve sliced a shot toward a pond but I kept my eye on it as it rolled over a bank.
    “I think I can find it,” I said and I headed towards the water, actually hoping to find some balls for Roger The City Manager to replace the ones I’d lost. I did locate Steve’s orange ball next to an old tire at the water’s edge and I saw another ball in the water which I sought to claim by scooping it up with an eight iron.
    But then the “tire” straightened out and I realized it was a big old alligator. Now I’ve dealt with geese, wild turkeys, squirrels, ground hogs, and even a moose at Loudon Country Club, but never an alligator.
    I stood near the gator and had an idea. I’d ask Steve to let me play his ball with my eight iron. And I’d ask him to get a phone video of me making the shot just inches from the alligator. Surely the video would go viral. I could see it making the Golf Channel! If the gator attacked, well, I’d wield my deadly eight iron.
    But then Wendy The Ranger/Beer Girl, drove by in the Refreshment Cart and yelled at me.
    “Hey! Get away from that alligator! What are you, some kind of nut?”
    I retreated, more afraid of Wendy than the gator.
    Steve got a free drop.

    Sports Quiz
    What was the original nickname for the Oakland pro football franchise? (Answer follows)

    Born Today …
    That is to say, sports standouts born on Dec. 29 include legendary Green Bay Packer middle linebacker Ray Nitschke (1936) and renowned MLB baseball executive Theo Epstein (1973).

    Sportsquote
    “Football is not a contact sport. It is a collision sport. Dancing is a contact sport.” Michigan State football coach Duffy Daugherty

    Sportsquiz Answer
    A “Name the football team” contest in Oakland in April, 1960 resulted with the “Señors” as the top choice. Nine days later the owners arbitrarily changed the team’s nickname to “Raiders,” the contest’s third place finisher.

    Michael Moffett is a Professor of Sports Management for Plymouth State University and NHTI-Concord, while also teaching on-line for New England College. He co-authored the critically-acclaimed and award-winning “FAHIM SPEAKS: A Warrior-Actor’s Odyssey from Afghanistan to Hollywood and Back” (with the Marines)—which is available through Amazon.com. His e-mail address is mimoffett@comcast.net.


  • Cleveland Browns

    Mike Moffett

     by Mike Moffett
    Weirs Times Columnist

    “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times … it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity …” – Charles Dickens, “A Tale of Two Cities”
    Dickens was writing of London and Paris. I write of Foxboro and Cleveland—of Patriots and Browns. New England’s NFL franchise has been a top Super Bowl Contender for 16 straight years. Cleveland’s current NFL franchise, established in 1999, has seen losing season after losing season. These Browns never make the playoffs. They were 3-13 last year and started this season with 12 straight losses.
    It wasn’t always so for the Browns. Named for their original coach, Paul Brown, the team dominated the All-America Conference in the late 1940s, going 47–4–3 and winning four titles in four years. They joined the NFL in 1950 and immediately won the league title. Led by quarterback Otto Graham, the team played in six straight NFL Championship Games. Superstar running back Jim Brown joined the team in 1957 and the Browns remained constant contenders, winning another title in 1964.

    Johnny Manziel

    Then fortunes changed for the Browns’ passionate fans, who dressed up as dogs and barked and yelped from end-zone seats in what came to be called “The Dog Pound.”
    The Dogs wondered if their beloved Browns were cursed, as the team lost two conference championship games in the closing moments in 1987 and 1988, just missing out on Super Bowl trips. Cleveland is the only NFL city never to experience a Super Bowl. (Jacksonville’s Jaguars have been around since 1995, and also have never been to a Super Bowl, although the city has hosted one.)
    Still, the Dog Pound and Municipal Stadium were always packed with devoted fans who never gave up hope. Their reward? Owner Art Modell moved the team to Baltimore after the 1995 season and renamed them the Ravens. Cruelly, the Ravens would win a couple Super Bowls.
    Cleveland had no team for several years, but built a stadium anyway and the NFL rewarded the city with a franchise which took the traditional “Browns” nickname. But unlike the old Browns, the new Browns became perennial losers.
    The team was the subject of a 2013 movie starring Kevin Costner called “Draft Day” where a general manager turned around the team’s fortunes by acquiring key draft picks and getting a franchise quarterback. The 2014 Browns sought to emulate the movie by drafting Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel.
    Manziel’s career started poorly during his first pre-season when he was fined $12,000 for flipping the bird at heckling fans. He played little over two seasons and was released by the team following a series of embarrassing alcohol-related incidents. Manziel’s experience was a metaphor for new Browns tradition of “flailing failure.”
    Patriot fans—so spoiled by the success of the Brady/Belichick era—should ponder the plight of Browns fans.
    Eventually the Paris of Dickens’ time rallied and became the “City of Light.” Can the Browns similarly rally and someday march into the broad, sunlit uplands populated by Patriots, Packers, and Panthers?
    May all those fans in the Dog Pound—as well the Browns’ lone New Hampshire fan—someday get to sample that sweet taste of success that Patriot fans so routinely enjoy.

    Sports Quiz
    Next April will see the Boston Celtics celebrating the 60th anniversary of their first NBA championship. Whom did the Celtics beat in the Finals that year? (Answer follows)

    Born Today …
    That is to say, sports standouts born on Dec. 15 include former Patriot and Dolphin linebacker Nick Buoniconti (1940) and NFL defensive back Rodney Harrison (1972).

    Sportsquote
    “You can sum up the game of baseball in one word: ‘You never know.’ “—Joaquin Andujar, St. Louis Cardinals

    Sportsquiz Answer
    Bill Russell and Tom Heinsohn led the Celtics to a 125-123 Game #7 overtime victory over the St. Louis Hawks on April 13, 1957 at the old Boston Garden.

    Michael Moffett is a Professor of Sports Management for Plymouth State University and NHTI-Concord, while also teaching on-line for New England College. He co-authored the critically-acclaimed and award-winning “FAHIM SPEAKS: A Warrior-Actor’s Odyssey from Afghanistan to Hollywood and Back” (with the Marines)—which is available through Amazon.com. His e-mail address is mimoffett@comcast.net.


  • Notre Dame Football

    Mike Moffett

     by Mike Moffett
    Weirs Times Columnist

    NEWS ITEM— The University of Notre Dame is forfeiting all football victories from the 2012 and 2013 seasons due to violations of NCAA rules by a student-trainer.
    What? This can’t be true!
    With all the shenanigans that we know go on with so many big-time college football programs, is the NCAA actually going to screw the Fighting Irish like this? Over a student-trainer?
    Apparently.
    USA TODAY reported that the NCAA Division I Committee on Infractions panel ruled the student-trainer violated ethical conduct rules when she committed academic misconduct by helping two football players complete their coursework. Three players allegedly committed individual academic misconduct, violating the school’s academic integrity policy. The student-trainer also provided inappropriate assistance to six other players.

    Notre Dame Coach Brian Kelly is not pleased with the current NCAA ruling.
    Notre Dame Coach Brian Kelly is not pleased with the current NCAA ruling.

    Continue reading  Post ID 2825


  • Kickers, Pressure and TR

    Mike Moffett

     by Mike Moffett
    Weirs Times Columnist

    “It’s not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles…The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena…who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.” – Teddy Roosevelt
    I thought of TR’s quote while watching the recent 27-27 NFL tie game in London between the Cincinnati Bengals and the Washington’s Redskins. A missed PAT by Bengal kicker Mike Nugent arguably cost Cincinnati the win—much as New England kicker Steve Gostkowski’s missed PAT in the playoffs against Denver in January arguably cost the Patriots a trip to Super Bowl L.
    Washington appeared to have the game won with 2:13 left in overtime, but then Redskin kicker Dustin Hopkins sliced HIS 34-yard field goal attempt wide left.
    The FOX camera’s focused on Hopkins afterwards, standing isolated on the sidelines. My heart went out to his friends and family. Presumably Hopkins’ mom watched the poignant imagery and her heart must have ached to see her son’s miscue shown to untold millions around the world. She had to be aware that countless Washington fans (and numerous gamblers) must be cursing her son’s failure.
    We all deal with various pressures, but the stress on NFL kickers is profound. While they get paid well, imagine having millions of people watch you make a costly mistake on national television! Continue reading  Post ID 2825